Hacker Bits, Issue 19

Hacker Bits Cover, Issue 19

Welcome to issue 19 of Hacker Bits!

We’ll be publishing Ask Hacker Bits (our first column!) in about two weeks!

Ask Hacker Bits (or Ask HB)  is a new column that features actual tech questions submitted from programmers just like you. We’re going to try to keep the column language agnostic. Stay tuned.

Without further ado, here’s issue 19… 🙂

Hacker Bits, Issue 18

Hacker Bits Cover, Issue 18

Welcome to issue 18 of Hacker Bits!

We got a ton of feedback, and we hope it shows in the evolution of Hacker Bits.

Thanks to each and everyone who wrote to us! We are overwhelmed by the number of responses. 🙂

We generally try to reply to everyone. Because we got some similar responses, we’re going to batch some of them together in blog posts or email distribution lists.

Please… keep them coming, and enjoy the new issue!

Hacker Bits, Issue 17

Hacker Bits Cover, Issue 17

Welcome to issue 17 of Hacker Bits!

June marks the half-way point in the year of 2017. So what are you learning? How are you being more productive? What are you doing to stay current? Let us now. 🙂

We’ve got some feedback from y’all about JavaScript articles, so we’ve found some highly-upvoted ones this month. Learning and improving are also common topics we’re hearing from you, and we’ve included a number of articles about that as well.

Keep letting us know what you think, and enjoy the new issue!

Hacker Bits, Issue 16

Hacker Bits Cover, Issue 16

Welcome to issue 16 of Hacker Bits!

We have a diverse mix of topics this month ranging from:

  • Microservices to…
  • Malware to…
  • Full stack web development to…
  • Resume writing

As always, if there’s something you’d like to see in upcoming issues, please let us know! 🙂

Check out Hacker Bits, Issue 16 .

Hacker Bits, Issue 14

Hacker Bits, Issue 14 Cover

Welcome to issue 14 of Hacker Bits!

You gave us feedback, and we’re making some adjustments to Hacker Bits.

What we’re hearing is that the 3 key themes continue to be:

  1. Learning more
  2. Working less
  3. Staying current

Additionally, Hacker Bits will move towards an email magazine/newsletter format.

Although you love the content of the magazine, you found the PDF/Yumpu format too heavyweight. We get it. With a busy professional or student life, there’s too much friction to open up the magazine.

Also, there’s content that you’d love to see in the magazine (e.g. technology + societal impact, more C/C++) that aren’t featured.

With our new newsletter format, we hope to better serve you. If you have a few minutes, please let us know what you think.

Click here: Hacker Bits, Issue 14

PS: Thank you for all the feedback, and special thanks to Ariz, John B., Zlatin, Rik and Srinath for their very detailed responses! 🙂

Hacker Bits, Issue 13

Hacker Bits, Issue 13

Happy 1-year anniversary everyone!

When we launched Hacker Bits a year ago, not in our wildest dreams did we expect such a warm response from our readers and contributors. So thank you to all of you who have made Hacker Bits possible!

In this issue’s most highly-upvoted article, Joel Spolsky, who needs no further introduction, tells us all about developers’ side projects and its common pitfalls.

Interested in web fonts? Then don’t miss Monica Dinculescu’s lazy approach to web fonts. And before you get swept up in the AI craze, don’t miss Professor Robin Hanson’s explanation on the limitations of AI and why like most fads, it’s doomed to bust.

And remember, Hacker Bits is here for you. We want it to be relevant to your goals, aspirations and resolutions.

So if you have any technology-related resolutions, let us know in this form.

We’re here to help!

Check out the next issue!

Hacker Bits, Issue 12

Hacker Bits Cover, Issue 12

Is interviewing candidates a good way to hire for the tech industry?

Developer Amir Yasin doesn’t think so. In this issue’s most highly-upvoted article, he shows us how to hire the best candidate for the job with 2 innovative ideas.

Who says boring is bad?

Just ask Jason Kester who’d eschewed new shiny tech for boring stacks and found happiness along the way. In this short and enlightening piece, Jason shows us how a boring stack can lead one to developer joy.

If you’ve ever wondered how to be a contributor on GitHub, then look no further than Davide Coppola’s handy tutorial on how to contribute to an open source project on GitHub.

As we wrap up the 12th issue of Hacker Bits, we want to thank you all for reading and offering feedback on improving the magazine. We hope Hacker Bits has helped you stay current on tech, and we look forward to another exciting year where you’ll learn more and read less!

Happy holidays, and see you back here next year!

Hacker Bits, Issue 11

Hacker Bits Cover, Issue 11

Welcome to the December issue of Hacker Bits!

If you’re looking for some positivity after a grueling election season, then you’ve come to the right place.

Brian Gilham recounts a delightful anecdote about the importance of being kind, and we think it’s just what everyone needs.

As always, our team of experts is here to offer their insights on how to become a better programmer.

In this issue…

Bill Cruise a.k.a. Bill the Lizard, gives us the lowdown on books programmers read, and ones that they claim to have read.

It’s easy to feel old in an industry populated with wide-eyed twenty-somethings, but take heart and read what veteran software engineer Ben Northrop has to say about being an “old” programmer.

And lastly…

For y’all Python enthusiasts out there, Tim Abbott gives us an in depth report on the state of static types in Python.

Check out the new issue